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eISSN: 2329-0358

Modified charlson comorbidity index in predicting early mortality after liver transplantation

M Wasilewicz, J Raszeja-Wyszomirska, M Wójcicki, P Milkiewicz

Ann Transplant 2009; 14(1): 39-40

ID: 880341

Published: 2009-05-21


Background: Charlson Co morbidity Index-Orthotopic LT (CCI-OLT) is a modified clinical score recently found to be useful in the assessment of a long term survival after liver transplantation (LTx) (Volk et al. Liver Transplantation 2007). It includes 9 most important associated conditions selected in multivariate analysis on a large cohort of transplanted patients. Its role in predicting early mortality after LTx has not yet been investigated. Aim: Evaluation of CCI-OLT as a potential predictor of one-month mortality after LTx.
Material/Methods: A group of 169 consecutive patients (103 males and 67 females, median age in both groups 51 years) who received their elective LTx at our centre was analysed. Patients transplanted for fulminant hepatic failure were excluded from the analysis. Viral (39%) and alcohol induced (23%) cirrhosis were most common indications for LTx. CCI-OLT index was assessed in all patients. Statistical analysis was performed with StatView Program.
Results: 146 (86%) subjects survived and 23 (14%) died within 1 month after
LTx. Fifty one (30%) patients suffered from at least 1 co-morbidity included in CCI-OLT index, a number significantly lower than in population studied by Volk et al. Direct comparison of the groups of survivors and non-survivors showed no significant difference in terms of the total frequency of co-morbidities (30.1% vs. 30.4%, p>0.99), their number and type. The most common associated condition in both groups was diabetes mellitus.
Conclusions: Contrary to the long term survival, CCI-OLT does not seem to have a role as a predictor of early (one-month) mortality after LTx.

Keywords: Liver Transplantation



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