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Social and cultural background of live donor kidney transplants – a sociological survey research report

K Kowal

Ann Transplant 2009; 14(1): 57-57

ID: 880407

Published: 2009-05-21


Background: In spite of numerous reasons justifying live donor kidney transplants quoted constantly by transplant surgeons, marginal rate of family transplantations has been still a fact in our society. Such a situation stimulates reflection. After all, Poland is perceived in Europe as a country with very strong familial bonds. We are also characterized by high family solidarity.
Material/Methods: Diagnosing of social and cultural reasons for live donor
kidney transplants and specifying the types of barriers to such surgeries have
been chosen as a purpose of this thesis. 2 500 adult Polish subjects took part
in a survey sent via e-mail.
Results: A definite majority of respondents (75.4%) accepts live donor kidney transplants. Among recipients whom the survey participants would be ready to give a living kidney they often pointed out: a child - 46.2% and a spouse -32.1%. An emotional relationship with the recipient was indicated as the most important motive in donating a kidney (42.2%). The respondents frequently expressed their readiness to accept a living kidney from siblings (21.0%) and parents (19.3%). However, nearly half of the respondents (47.5%) would take a kidney from a live donor only in a life- threatening situation. Concern about donor's health (31.8%) and life (30.8%) were the most often indicated reasons for such a decision.
Conclusions: Donating a kidney to a deathly sick person is considered as a special type of imperative related to emotional closeness among people. The more intense emotional relationships in a family, there is more often unconditional readiness to donate a living kidney. However, accepting an organ from a close relative appears much more difficult than offering it. The respondents indicated that they would be able to accept an organ only from some people.

Keywords: Kidney Transplantation, Living Donors



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