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eISSN: 2329-0358

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Management of Liver Allograft Trauma Resulting in Massive Subcapsular Hematoma After Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Can We Salvage the Liver Allograft?

Shih-Chao Hsu, Ashok Thorat, Kin-Shing Poon, Chun-Chieh Yeh, Te-Hung Chen, Horng-Ren Yang, Long-Bin Jeng

(Department of Surgery, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan)

Ann Transplant 2017; 22:1-8

DOI: 10.12659/AOT.901006


BACKGROUND: Liver allograft trauma resulting in subcapsular hematoma after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), although rare, is a life-threatening condition and requires prompt management to avoid any catastrophe. Herein we describe our successful experience in dealing with liver allograft hematoma that developed in the post-operative period after LDLT.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: From January 2002 to May 2015, a total of 616 recipients underwent LDLT at our institute. The intra-operative and postoperative records of these patients were analyzed to study the cases of liver allograft hematoma. Four patients (n=4) who developed liver allograft subcapsular hematoma during the intra-operative and post-operative periods were included in study. The outcomes of these patients were studied after the administration of the medical, surgical, or combined modalities of treatment.
RESULTS: Out of 616 LDLT recipients, 4 (0.64%) developed subcapsular hematoma. Patients were managed by a stepwise approach: Initial non-operative management with transarterial embolization (if extravasation of the contrast was noticed during imaging studies) was performed (n=1). Three patients developed hemodynamic instability with signs of hematoma rupture and were successfully treated by surgical exploration.
CONCLUSIONS: Timely diagnosis and suitable management can successfully salvage a liver allograft even in the presence of massive subcapsular hematoma. Our emphasis is on perihepatic packing rather than open surgical drainage if exploration is required, which can achieve a 100% success rate.

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