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24 December 2015 : Original article  

Risk Factors for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction and Symptoms After Successful Renal Transplantation

Takahiko MitsuiABCDEF, Kimihiko MoriyaDEF, Ken MoritaABCDEF, Daiki IwamiABCDEF, Takeya KittaDEF, Yukiko KannoDEF, Masayuki TakedaDEF, Nobuo ShinoharaABCDEF

DOI: 10.12659/AOT.895515

Ann Transplant 2015; 20:757-763

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We investigated risk factors for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction and LUT symptoms in patients who successfully underwent renal transplantation (RTX).

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety-five patients (54 males and 41 females) undergoing RTX (median age: 45 years old) at Hokkaido University Hospital were included in this study. Uroflowmetry (UFM), postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), and 24-h bladder diaries were performed. We analyzed risk factors for voiding dysfunction, urinary frequency, polyuria, nocturia, and nocturnal polyuria after RTX using logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS: End-stage renal disease arose from diabetes mellitus in 18 patients (19%). Pre-transplant dialysis had been carried out in 74 patients. Voiding dysfunction as assessed by UFM and PVR was observed in 24 patients (27%). Based on the 24-h bladder diaries, we identified frequent micturition in 29 patients (35%), polyuria in 44 (54%), nocturia in 30 (37%), and nocturnal polyuria in 46 (56%). A multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus, which may cause autonomic disorders, was a risk factor for voiding dysfunction and nocturnal polyuria. A risk factor for frequent micturition and nocturia was older age at RTX. Being female was a risk factor for polyuria, which suggested that fluid intake in relation to body weight was higher in females.

CONCLUSIONS: LUT dysfunction and LUT symptoms were not uncommon in patients who successfully underwent RTX. LUT dysfunction and LUT symptoms need to be considered in patients with risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, older age at RTX, and being female, even after successful RTX.

Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus, Kidney Transplantation, Lower urinary tract symptoms, Risk Factors, Urinary Bladder, Overactive, Urinary Tract Physiological Phenomena

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Annals of Transplantation eISSN: 2329-0358
Annals of Transplantation eISSN: 2329-0358